Real-life within communication

Trying to explain complicated subjects is a huge challenge to all communicators and we try to find different ways of ensuring an increase in understanding. It is not just getting people interested that we need to focus on. We have to be able to make complex issues clear.

A great way of being able to make things easy to grasp is to be able to show some form of visualisation. Increasingly people are gathering information through visual as well as written communication. It is the visual communication that often grabs attention much more than written, particularly on social media. With a creative team you can make visually appealing communication that simplifies messages.

It is always worth remembering that case studies and real-life examples can say much more than any professional or boss. People who are living with the issue, or have experienced the thing you are explaining can provide the most authentic voice to the communication package. They can give real details of what the issue felt like with specific details. Being able to have real people with real experiences is something I think as communicators we don’t value as much as we should.

The use of real experiences is widely used within internal communication but not as much for external activity. Internal communicators have long recognised that customers, service users or those affected by the business have a lot to give. They can remind people what is important about the business and what matters. They can highlight how things go wrong and what it feels like with a huge amount of integrity.

For me, this may take some time to source, develop and get agreed but it brings significant results. I would be interested to hear more from people who have used real case studies to support their communication activity particularly around complex subjects.

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This entry was posted in #ayearinblogs, communication, emergency services, ideas, internal communication, public, Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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